1st November 2020

Diverse Communities gathering for solidarity with civic, community and faith leaders at Manchester Cathedral 

Moving speech by Qadir Chohan, Chair of MCOM, at today’s gathering of solidarity with civic, community and faith leaders at Manchester Cathedral which was followed by a signing of a pledge to stand together against hate and hatred and to build a safer, stronger Greater Manchester.
“Ladies and Gentleman
Brothers and Sisters
Assalaam-o-alaikum
Peace upon you all
On that fateful Monday there was that one single act of inhumanity, so unimaginable, so unspeakable
That has left a trail of pain and suffering
Many loved ones have been lost
Many lives have been changed forever
 
•​Compassion
•​Solidarity
•​Love  
These are the pillars of hope that rebuild a city from horror and despair
Pillars too which can comfort and console the bereaved
 
To those who grieve
Know  
Know
Here and out there
There are shoulders to cry on
There is strength in tears when shed together  
 
And whilst hearts are wounded
It is also the place where the light can enter
To my fellow Mancunians
This brutal and cowardly act of inhumanity cannot and should not define us or our great city
Nor should we focus on the coldness of that night or the one who shattered lives
But let us remember how we came together – to comfort each other – to support each other – Christian, Sikh, Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, people of all faiths and beliefs – in the name of our God and our service to humanity – Remember
·​The many taxi drivers taking people home for no charge
·​The restaurants and takeaways supplying food for the emergency services
·​The doctors and surgeons, police and ambulance crews working through the night for the injured
And the day afterward and the days that have past – remember the outpouring of an abundance of compassion, solidarity and love from every corner of our community to the families and friends of the victims.
We saw too, many mosques, churches synagogues in Greater Manchester donate their collections towards supporting the victims and their families.
Now let us be clear – this atrocity has no place in my religion or any religion or this our humanity. Despite those who wish to say otherwise his act does not represent the 3 million Muslims in the UK or the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide.
 
My friends  
In these most trying of times
When grief is all too real and all too raw
Let us pray and let our prayers be answered
Let us once again see the world through a child’s eye – as one family, one united humanity
Let us work on keeping close to each other, on building bridges with strangers and friends alike.
Let us challenge those who promote division and hate whether here or afar
Let us defeat the idea that violence can achieve anything but destruction
Let the sea of flowers that adorn St. Ann’s Square with messages of solidarity and defiance be our conviction for a better tomorrow  
 
Let me end with a prayer for peace
In the Name of God, the Most Kind, Most Merciful:
Praise be to the Lord of the Universe
Who has created us and made us into tribes and nations that we may know each other,
not that we may despise each other.
Trust in God for the Lord is the One that hears and knows all things.
And the servants of God are those who walk on the Earth in humility,
and when we address them, we say, ‘Peace’ “

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *